Columbia Records Set to Release ‘Shine Through It,’ the Highly Anticipated Debut Album of Music from the Acclaimed Actor/Musician Terrence Howard

‘Shine Through It’ Available in Stores & Online Tuesday, September 2

Columbia Records is proud to announce the release of Shine Through It — the avidly awaited debut album of new music written, produced and performed by Terrence Howard — on Tuesday, September 2.

For Shine Through It, Howard has written, arranged and produced 11 original songs for a collection heralded in the Los Angeles Times (May 3, 2008) as a “stylish retro neo-soul album…Howard and his backing outfit…conjure up a smooth blend of flamenco guitars, swooning violins, hard drums and dazzling trumpet lines that recall an eclectic combination of John Legend, Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass and a dash of Cab Calloway.”

Produced by Terrence Howard, Shine Through It was recorded at Spiral Recording in Hollywood with Terrence Howard on vocals and lead guitar; Miles Mosley (Lauryn Hill, Herbie Hancock, Common, Chris Cornell, Jonathan Davis), who also co-produced, on upright bass, guitar, drums and piano; Kamasi Washington (Gerald Wilson, Roy Hargrove) on tenor sax; Serafin Aguilar on trumpet; Kenneth Crouch (Mariah Carey, Patti LaBelle, Eric Clapton) on keyboards and Tom Lea on viola.

Covering a Los Angeles listening session for Shine Through It, People (April 21, 2008), noted, “The album chronicles everything from broken relationships on ‘It’s All Game’ to self-reflection on ‘Plenty’ and the celebration of love on his single, ‘Love Makes You Beautiful.’ Howard told the audience that he began writing songs at age 16 in his ‘rainbow colored notebook,’ and discussed recording an “emotionally sobering” song that began as a letter to his ex-wife. The collection of songs is highly reminiscent of a live, big band, jazz feel, which Howard backs up by playing the guitar.”

Songs on Shine Through It include “Love Makes You Beautiful,” with its flamenco melody and haunting flute, inspired by watching people made beautiful from being in love; the dramatic, soulful “Shine Through It,” with its piano and acoustic guitar groove building to a cinematic climax of strings and horns expressing the light of spirituality; the highly personal “No. 1 Fan”; the island rhythms, south-of-the-border horns, hip-hop rhythms and Cuban flair in “Mr. Johnson’s Lawn”; “I Remember When,” with its warm vibe, and whistling intro recalling adolescent romance; the jaggedly bombastic “War”; the soulful, romantic “Sanctuary” (inspired by Howard’s chance meeting with Seal and Heidi Klum at a Hollywood party); the instrumental “Spanish Love Affair,” with its horn solo, Latin guitars and Middle East feel; “She Was Mine,” a sophisticated jazz-blues shuffle about falling in love at a stop light; and “Plenty,” with its “Super Fly” vibe and ominous hip-hop undercurrent.

Raised in Cleveland with many summers spent in New York City, Terrence Howard, an aspiring songwriter and musician since early adolescence, landed his first film and television acting roles in the late 1980s before his breakthrough performance in the 1995 film, “Mr. Holland’s Opus.” A succession of theatrical and television films — including “Ray,” “Crash,” “Lackawanna Blues,” “Hustle & Flow,” “Four Brothers,” “Get Rich or Die Tryin’,” and “Brave One” — established Terrence Howard as a major screen talent. His most recent film, “Iron Man,” opened at #1 across America with the highest-grossing opening weekend of 2008, the second-highest grossing premiere ever for a non-sequel film, and the 10th biggest movie opening weekend of all-time.

Howard’s role as “DJay” in the 2005 musical-drama “Hustle & Flow” earned him numerous accolades (including Oscar, Golden Globe and Image Award nominations for Best Actor) while his musical performances in the film brought home several high profile honors including the Academy Award for Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song (“It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp”) and the Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards Critics Choice Award for which Howard received the award for Best Song (“Hustle and Flow”).

“Music has always been the road that leads to where I’m headed,” says Terrence. “Film is my vocation, my 9 to 5. In the movies, I’m doing what somebody else is asking me to do. Music is my own personal form of expression. My responsibility, like the sun’s, is to shine. Even if the planet is covered with clouds, I must say what I have to say.”

www.columbiarecords.com

Author: James McQuiston

Ph.D. in Political Science, Kent State University. I have been the editor at NeuFutur / neufutur.com since I was 15. Looking for new staff members all the time; email me if you are interested. Thanks!

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