MMP Set To Re-release “Brechen” and “Schmerz” in September for U.S. Audiences

Drecksau always defined their musical inspirations very precisely – just take a hint of the muddy sound of the American south and mix it with the violent German attitude, then you’ll pretty much get the idea what these guys are all about. But the best part is that this band perfectly blends both cultures – American and German – delivering a prime example of doomcore madness with a handful of their own original ideas.

Metal Mind Productions presents the exclusive re-release of albums “Brechen” and “Schmerz” which introduce one of Germany’s finest sludge/doomcore groups and a truly original name on the German metal scene.

“Brecher”, the debut album from 1998, feat. thirteen crushing tracks produced in Stage One Studio by Andy Classen, a well-known sound engineer (he worked with such acts as Tankard, Disbelief, Rotting Christ and Krisiun) and ex-Holy Moses guitarist. The album was a concrete mixture of slow and heavy guitars with angry vocals sung entirely in German (except for the short tune “Grey Suit”). With short intros preceding each song, the album’s content was a raw and straight-forward ride – no bullshitting. Featuring an extremely deep, heavy and voluminous sound emitting quite negative vibes, this remarkable debut had been more than a decent result for the band, but polarized the audience and the press into either enthusiastic lovers or dedicated haters. However, “Brecher” showed only a small part of the band’s potential – the best was yet to come… In 1999 Drecksau returned with a follow-up album entitled “Schmerz” (“Pain”). Again produced by Classen, the LP showcased a much more centered approach towards doomcore – the music is heavier and more varied than on the debut album. Typical doom tracks (such as “Defrost” or “Doom”) intertwine with mid-tempo hardcore bulldozers (“Aschergen”, Days Of Fire”, “Release”), creating altogether a memorable sludge experience. The most unique track, however, is the surprising cover version of “Diesmal hat er sich gewehrt” (“This time he defended”) by Peter Maffay – the way this mellow tune is transformed into a raging doomcore monster is simply amazing. All in all, “Schmerz” proved to be the best work in the band’s entire discography.

Both albums will be released on 7th July 2008 in Europe and 2nd September 2008 in USA (via MVD). Classic material from Nuclear Blast archives will be available in a new digipak edition, limited to numerated 2000 copies each. Digitally remastered using 24-Bit process on golden disc.

Drecksau
“Brecher” (remastered)

Label: Metal Mind Records
Cat. No.: MASS CD 1187 DG
Barcode: 5907785032828
Format: CD Digipak (limited edition of 2000 numerated copies)
Genre: sludge/doom/core metal
Release date: 07.07.2008 Europe / 02.09.2008 USA

Tracklist:

1. Kreuzgang
2. Der Schlund
3. Keiler
4. Salz
5. Schänder
6. Hetzer
7. Furcht
8. Tränennacht
9. Grey Suit
10. Brecher
11. Der Sohn
12. Tief in mir
13. Endlager

Drecksau
“Schmerz” (remastered)

Label: Metal Mind Records
Cat. No.: MASS CD 1188 DG
Barcode: 5907785032835
Format: CD Digipak (limited edition of 2000 numerated copies)
Genre: sludge/doom/core metal
Release date: 07.07.2008 Europe / 02.09.2008 USA

Tracklist:

1. Paintro
2. E-Wand
3. Ascheregen
4. Diesmal hat er sich gewehrt
5. Interceptor
6. Defrost
7. Days of Fire
8. Schmerz
9. Release
10. Krieg der Freiheit
11. Doom
12. Verlierer

Bio
Drecksau (literally meaning “dirt(y) sow”, a very strong insult in some regions of Germany) was originally formed in Nürnberg, Bavaria in 1996, when Nobbe M. Scherer (guitar, vocals) and Michael Seitz (bass) teamed up with Dirk Friedmann (drums) and started working on some sludge/doom material. A year later the guys released a demo called “Schänder” (“Desecrator”), which took them only three days to record. The tape caught the attention of GSM Records, who agreed to release the band’s debut LP (which at that time was to be called “Endlager”). Eventually Drecksau signed a deal with a different label – the highly acclaimed Nuclear Blast Records – and changed the name of their first album to “Brecher” (“Breaker”). The LP hit the stores on October 26th, 1998…
“Brecher” brought thirteen crushing tracks produced in Stage One Studio by Andy Classen, a well-known sound engineer (he worked with such acts as Tankard, Disbelief, Rotting Christ and Krisiun) and ex-Holy Moses guitarist. The album was a concrete mixture of slow and heavy guitars with angry vocals sung entirely in German (except for the short tune “Grey Suit”). With short intros preceding each song, the album’s content was a raw and straight-forward ride – no bullshitting. However, “Brecher” showed only a small part of the band’s potential – the best was yet to come…
In 1999 Drecksau returned with a follow-up album entitled “Schmerz” (“Pain”). Again produced by Classen, the LP showcased a much more centered approach towards doomcore – the music is heavier and more varied than on the debut album. Typical doom tracks (such as “Defrost” or “Doom”) intertwine with mid-tempo hardcore bulldozers (“Aschergen”, Days Of Fire”, “Release”), creating altogether a memorable sludge experience. The most unique track, however, is the surprising cover version of “Diesmal hat er sich gewehrt” (“This time he defended”) by Peter Maffay – the way this mellow tune is transformed into a raging doomcore monster is simply amazing. All in all, “Schmerz” proved to be the best work in the band’s entire discography.
In 2001 the group recorded a promo EP called “Winter”, which was supposed to be sent only to record labels, however due to the fans’ request the band released it officially in 300 copies. In 2003 they returned with a new drummer – Rob Reber – and a new album called “Kältekammer” (which means “Cold Chamber”). A year later Marcus Giese joined the assemble as the new vocalist. Unfortunately, Scherer left Drecksau later that year and the group officially disbanded.
Both “Brechen” and “Schmerz” are the strongest parts of Drecksau’s legacy, presenting the German doomcore masters in their finest form. If you’re a fan of Crowbar or Totenmond, be sure to add these two extraordinary albums to your collection and get ready to be annihilated by the mighty sludge sound of Drecksau!

Author: James McQuiston

Ph.D. in Political Science, Kent State University. I have been the editor at NeuFutur / neufutur.com since I was 15. Looking for new staff members all the time; email me if you are interested. Thanks!

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