Steve Steele – The Expat (CD)

“Revelation on the Radio” is an absolute epic track in the vein of Styx or Queens of the Stone Age. While rooted firmly in the rock genre, listeners can hear equal amounts of metal (Fear Factory) and even punk (Jello Biafra) present in Steele’s first cut. “Via Satellite” provides listeners with a tremendous amount of energy, as Steele’s vocals drive into listeners with all of the allure of a Tubronegro or even of a Dani Filth. “My Brother, The Devil” kicks the instrumental side of things into high gear, as a darker sound issues forth during this track. Taking a page from 45 Grave or “The Top”-era Cure, Steele’s work here ensures that listeners will not get the same sense of lull that is present on a great many current albums.

“Godwin Park” continues ramping up the momentum, despite having a much more intricate feel than “My Brother, The Devil”. The back and forth that is achieved with the vocals allow the narrative weaved by Steele to be especially effecting. This introduction is given a bold exclamation point with the guitar and drum barrage that follows; at five and a half minutes, “Godwin Park” may just be the disc’s most epic track. The song still represents the same type of dark, hard rock that has been the norm on “The Expat”, but follows a much more classic sort of composition. The different movements that listeners will be witness to seems to me to be like scenes from a movie, a microcosm of the different paths and tales that the whole of “The Expat” provides.

“Star City” is the final track on “The Expat”, and exists in the middle zone between New Romantic, goth, industrial, and metal genres. The track converts a diverse collection of Steele’s influences into a cohesive and cogent song, while acting as the perfect end to the album. This expansive track gives listeners brief flashes of what could conceivably come to be on further Steele efforts, while showcasing a never say die attitude to the album’s last notes.

Top Tracks: Revelation on the Radio, My Brother, The Devil

Rating: 8.3/10

Steve Steele – The Expat / 2011 Self / 12 Tracks / www.stevesteele.com / www.twitter.com/thestevesteele

About James McQuiston

Ph.D. in Political Science, Kent State University. I have been the editor at NeuFutur / neufutur.com since I was 15. Looking for new staff members all the time; email me if you are interested. Thanks!
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3 Comments

  1. Steve Steele is a musical genius, and The Expat is one of my new all time favorite discs. The first time I heard it I was completely astounded by the textures that Steve was able to create. I hear something new everytime I listen to it. It sounds really great on the headphones. This CD is not just a collection of songs, but rather a continuous thematic hour long journey that will pull you into the places where The Expat lives. This is a disc for people who really still truly love music in all of it’s forms. I think there may be a few of us left. I am hoping.

    Bill Nelson
    The Bill Nelson Band
    www.cdbaby.com/Artist/BillNelsonBand

  2. This review gives its’ readers a clear glimpse of what to expect from the tracks on The Expat. I couldn’t agree more; it is Epic!

    I just downloaded a copy of The Expat from iTunes! I’ve noticed that the CD’s artwork has been featured here by Neufutur. Good move! The music and the artwork go hand in hand with the metaphors and mystery woven by Steele’s lyrics and hard driving rhythm.

    I am no writer nor am I a critic, I simply love this music. The tracks become visual and the story beneath the music comes to life.

    Do yourself a favor and check it out!

  3. Steve is very talented. The music is interesting and his voice sounds abit like David Bowie…which is cool too.

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