Sitting down with Yajur

Today, we are speaking with Indian performer Yajur. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

My name’s Yajur. I’m 16 years old. I’m a singer-songwriter from India. I’m currently living in Singapore finishing high school. I’ve been involved with music since the age of 3. The decision to do this as a career happened in September 2016.

You are releasing a new record shortly. What was the writing/creative and recording process like? Continue reading “Sitting down with Yajur”

DJ NoMis Interview

Today, we are speaking with DJ NoMis. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

Sure! I’m currently a sophomore at Syracuse University studying Entrepreneurship & Emerging Enterprises, and I plan on minoring in Music Industry in the future. I’ve been working with music ever since I was 11 years old, but I’ve also done Boy Scouts, Karate and high school musical productions. I’ve made it to Eagle Scout, 1st degree black belt and had various leading roles in school. Continue reading “DJ NoMis Interview”

High Park Society Interview

Today, we are speaking with Frank Babic from the Mississauga project High Park Society. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

High Park Society is my music project that was driven by a love of classic rock and alt-80s.  It was started as a side project around 2015 out of another outfit I perform with in Toronto (Poor Man’s High) with songs for that band that came together to be the first releases by High Park Society.

I’ve been a musician all of my life, starting early at age 8 with taking organ lessons.  I began teaching music (organ, piano and guitar) in my teens.  I’d joined a soul/R&B cover band (Soulhammer) in the 90s while attending university for engineering (where my day job is an acoustic engineer).  I then focused on writing and home recording during the early 2000s for my personal benefit and pleasure.  Around 2010 I started picking up live music performance again with a Toronto outfit (The Better Lates), and now with my band Poor Man’s High.  High Park Society came about as a project that I can produce and record at home, with a signature style all my own, with contributions from musicians from all over the world.

 

You have been at work on your music for a number of years. What sort of work have you put into the recording and creative processes for this release?

On Your Mind started as a demo on a rented four-track in early 2000s, which sat dormant until now.  I’d finished my other singles “Indecision” and “When Bowie Died”, and resurrected it and redid the demo.  I really liked how it came together with the new demo, and started polishing it.  I brought on Emily Dolan Davies (UK session drummer with Howard Jones and Thompon Twins), and a trumpet player DJMAGIC85 out of Baltimore through Airgigs.com.  Lastly, I brought the mix to my engineer/producer Andre Mina, who does all of my music, to polish the song as you hear it now.

 

What does your recording set up look like (what do you use to record, what are your favorite tools)?

To start the demo process, I use Steinberg’s Sequel 3 program.  It’s like Garage Band, and allows me to easily capture snippets of music, and put things down quickly.  Then, I can setup sections and start building the song structure.

When I’m looking to polish the song, I re-record in Steinberg’s Cubase (currently using version 5).  I don’t do a lot of mixing/production myself, as I leave that to Andre to do for me.  I work to really hone down my takes and balance the mix, but leave it to Andre to put the final touches on it.

For equipment, I use a MXL 9000 microphone for all vocals, and I do all the lead and background vocals myself.  I also use a blue Gretch Electromatic (2016) or my black/white Mexican Strat (92) guitars with a Boss GT-8 multi-effects unit.  I use a few programs for keyboards, but it’s mainly HALion.  This is all fed through a Seinberg UR44 interface to a laptop.

All recording is done at home, late night after everyone is asleep.  Ironically, I have not done any significant acoustic treatment for the space, but have the room open up to a large rec room which give vocals some nice reverberation without any significant standing wave issues.

Tell us a bit more about your latest single On Your Mind. I understand you’ve just released a promo video for the track.

On Your Mind is a song about trying to understand those that you love, even when difficult decisions have to be made.  I reworked some of the original lyrics, leaning away from a “does she like me or not?” theme to a more mature “you are not the person I knew, and what should I do about it”.

I found the director through Fiverr, and a great young filmmaker in Haily MacIsaach.  She’s a student in Toronto at OCAD, and put this together for me, including developing the story imagery and the theme of the letter floating down the river.  You can see this video on our High Park Society YouTube channel.

 

Which artists are the greatest influences for you and your music? Is there a dream lineup of performers that you would like to perform with if given the chance?

Artists that were the greatest influences on me are by far The Smiths and The Cure, as well as The Beatles, U2 and the Velvet Underground.  I think you can hear this in my music, especially in the song On Your Mind.

For my dream lineup, I’d love to play with Morrissey, Robert Smith and Bono.  As a guitarist, I’d love to have Johnny Marr, The Edge (and Mick Ronson if he were with us) in the lineup as well.  For bass and drums, it would have to be a combination with Andy Rourke and Larry Mullen Jr.   If they were still with us, I’d polish it off with David Bowie and Lou Reed.

 

Which sort of social media website have you had the best successes with? What about these online services are different from the traditional face to face meeting and performances that musicians utilize?

I’m most successful with Facebook, as it is the best way to find those fans that are interested in music similar to High Park Society, and we are growing our fanbase there.  On Facebook, I’m able to connect with fans on the music, with interest pieces behind the music we are making, and musical anecdotes of common interests in our posts.  I see this as an effective communication method for our fanbase.

We are also on Reverbnation, which has allowed us to reach out to other indie artists.  This has really great to hear other artists, and I listen to it regularly to hear about music you don’t get on regular channels like radio or Spotify playlists.  Also, artists find us and become fans, which is really exciting.

As a DIY musician, I’m focusing on a social media approach to find and connect with fans.  I’m finding High Park Society music has a worldwide appeal, as to any specific local scene when face to face performances may be more appropriate.

 

What should listeners expect from your music in the future? How can interested NeuFutur readers locate samples of your music? How has the radio/Pandora/Spotify response been for your music?

We are finalizing our singles from this first set of work, again focusing on an alt-80s/classic rock sound with bass/drums/guitar/keys and trumpet.  I’ll be going into a writing phase in early 2018, and looking to explore some new song ideas, including forms and instrumentation, and continuing to expand lyrical themes.

NeuFutur readers can sign up on our mailing list at www.highparksociety.com to keep up with our newest music.  They can also follow us on Facebook, where we are keeping in constant touch with our fans (www.facebook.com/highparksociety).

You can find our catalog on Spotify, and we expect to focus on this in 2018 to grow and find new fans there.  I’m in Canada so I don’t have access to Pandora, but I understand we are on there.  I haven’t plugged much radio, but I’m looking to do so more with future releases.

 

What does the rest of 2017 (and early 2018) hold for your music?

High Park Society has put together a Christmas release titled “Home For Christmas” for 2017, which is a low-key take on the holiday season, trying to identify with those people that don’t really want to be part of the festivities.

There is also a new video being completed for When Bowie Died, set to release in January 2018 to commemorate the anniversary of Bowie’s passing.

Expect a new single and possible EP compilation for 2018.

 

 

 

Thank you so much for your time. Finally, do you have any additional thoughts about life and the universe for our readers?

Thanks so much for the interview.  I appreciate taking the time to listen to me, and talk about High Park Society.  I think it’s a great time for music – both in the listening and creating – and I think we can see great things in the future that bring artists and fans closer together than ever before.

Left Arm Tan Interview

Today, we are speaking with Fort Worth band Left Arm Tan. Can you give us a little background information about yourselves? How did you get into music?

Well, Left Arm Tan has been a band for about 7 years.  The three original members, Troy Austin, Tim Manders and Daniel Hines, got together to record an album for the fun of it in 2009.  We rehearsed five times and then went in the studio to record.  We really didn’t have any big plans or hopes for the album, which was called “Jim”, but we sent three copies out to the press.  Saving Country Music gave us Song of the Year in 2010 and Fort Worth Star Telegram called us a “band to watch.”  We sort of wish they had called us “band to pay” so we could have more money for gas and bandaids. Continue reading “Left Arm Tan Interview”

An interview with Project Mantra

Today, we are speaking with Leigh Bursey (singer and guitar player) and Justin Steacy (drummer) of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) band Project Mantra. 

Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

Leigh: Justin and I started jamming while he was in high school. The earliest versions of this group started while I was still a teenager. I had a way with words and a lot of opinions but I still needed to learn how to use my voice. Music was my platform, and for Justin it was very much the same. We set up an old Ludwig drum kit on the front lawn of my apartment building and jammed with my cheap acoustic until we knew we had something. And it’s been an up and down creative process ever since.

Justin: I learned how to perform with Project Mantra. I cut my teeth on that front lawn, and in basements and back room venues across the province.

You have just released a new single – Scream for Me. What was the writing/creative and recording process for the track like? How’d it differ from the rest of your new album, Moonlight Over Vagabond?

Leigh: I wrote the shell for Scream For Me. It was heavily inspired by some of David Lynch’s work with Twin Peaks. I related the indigenous firewalk ceremony and the tale of multiple realities to the common western God complex. This song isn’t just about existentialism but also about contempt for modern suffering that is so often ignored by societal hierarchies. It’s one of my favourite pieces of work and surprisingly simple and fluid. We’ve all met a Laura Palmer type character who’s circumstances could have been prevented and were ignored. The story is universal and multi-layered. Whiskey and a lonely night produced that song.

Justin: As for the recording process, we worked with Scott Burniston on that track at his home studio, and we hammered out as much of it as we could in a studio live format. The effects are minimal. The integrity of the song is intact. And it definitely revisits the grunge era.

Leigh: That one was approached the same way many of our favourite songs have been. Create and deliver. Produce and combine. Perform until it sounds right.

How does an acoustic performance from Project Mantra differ from the traditional band’s sound?

Justin: to be honest, they’ve often been one and the same. Right now for our next record, we are focusing on going back to the drawing board and reinventing ourselves a little. Going back to our roots.

Leigh: While we can often get loud and be eccentric and energetic and punky and artsy, at our core we were a folk punk band that loved the Pixies and wrote basic songs and lyrical monologues on acoustic guitars.

How supportive is the Ottawa music scene in furthering your career (e.g. radio stations, magazine, venues)?

Leigh: Ottawa is basically our home base. So much love for the city and its music. We have so many friends that we enjoy sharing the stage with, and we are lucky enough to do so with inspiring artists from all types of styles backgrounds. Brandon Bird and the Diamond Mine Agency have been great to us. As has Project Mantra alumni Alex Hodges and Pandamonium Promotions.

Justin: But we shouldn’t stop there. There are so many people to thank along the way. From Danika Villeneuve doing Leigh’s make up, to Art and Landmark, to our loyal fans and followers, and Jon MacDougall and Brandon Mead who sport Project Mantra themed tattoos. All members past and present. Ottawa is definitely our home.

Politics is a big part of your music. What sort of issues are of greatest importance to you? What is your ultimate political goal that you would like to achieve with your music?

Leigh: Everything is political. We might draw our music comparisons to the Pixies Smashing Pumpkins, and we might share the stage with the Rural Alberta Advantage, but at our core we are Clash and Against Me! fans. I’m a two term Brockville city councillor. I’m a social justice activist and have dragged the band into many political discussions over the years. From mental health to Lgbtq issues. Standing up against oppression, advocating for affordable housing investment, and absolutely no shortage of fundraisers, socio political conversation is an immense part of our band’s fabric. I don’t apologize for that for a second.

What does your recording set up look like (what do you use to record, what are your favorite tools)?

Justin: As minimalistic as possible. If we can’t duplicate it live then we aren’t doing ourselves or our audience any favours.

Leigh: At one point whiskey was my favourite tool. Now a great producer. That simple.

Which artists are the greatest influences for you and your music? Is there a dream lineup of performers that you would like to perform with if given the chance?

Justin: Pixies, July Talk, Rural Alberta Advantage and Against Me!

Leigh: and the White Stripes. We could probably go all day long on this one.

Which sort of social media website have you had the best successes with? What about these online services are different from the traditional face to face meeting and performances that musicians utilize?

Leigh: We are still developing our online product and presence. But so far the universal approach has been Facebook. We love interacting with people directly. That said, I still buy CDs. You should too. At the very least, they make attractive coasters.

Thank you so much for your time. Finally, do you have any additional thoughts about life and the universe for our readers?

Justin: Bands will fight and visions will change, but remember that in the end you’re family. If you’re not a family, you’re not a band.

Leigh: Never apologize for who you are. Give em Hell kids. Sometimes the best songs come after the breakdowns. 

Checking in with Palm Baker

Today, we are speaking with Toronto performer Palm Baker. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

Yeah, uh, I guess a bit about me – I’m a singer, songwriter, producer, & DJ working out of Toronto. I was born in Mississauga, but grew up in Brampton. No one outside of the GTA knows/cares that Brampton exists though, & if they do they just sort of roll their eyes – it’s cool though, I get it, but much love (haha).

I was always down with music. I played a bunch of instruments growing up – some better than others – but I don’t think it was until 2013 or 2014 when I built my first studio in my basement apartment in London, ON. that I started trying to at least figure something out.

I’ve since worked with artists across Canada, & the U.S., & even one set of homies out in Sweden. It got things moving for me. In January of 2017, I released my first ep Wayside (EP) & that got things rolling in Toronto. A couple show promoters got in contact with me & I got a chance to play The Mod Club, Revival Bar, & The Opera House all pretty soon out the gate. Presstown PR contacted me shortly after that, & asked to represent the work I was putting out & helped me network it to the right people. I started recording singles & producing with new sounds, & I guess two months after Wayside hit Toronto, I had already started planning my new album, Faces (EP).

Faces (EP) released in September, & went farther than I really could have hoped. The first single released from the album “L.A.” passed 22k on YouTube in just under a month & helped me land support from Skilly Mag, Rude Boy Lifestyle Mag, & Stencil Magazine. With the second release from the album, “Cocktails” I’m hoping to keep momentum going & share a bit more of a creative side with my fans. I’ve got a lot of people to thank, & a lot of people I’m still just in the process of meeting, but I have some new projects in the works & I’m stoked for whats next.

You have been deep at work on your next release. What sort of work have you put into the recording and creative processes for this release?

This time around, the projects are bigger, the videos are higher quality, & budgets for promo are going up – I’m stoked. A lot of time and emotion went into the making of the songs on this upcoming album & I’m feeling good about them. I can’t say much about it yet, but it will be my first full length (LP) CD & it’s set to release in 2018.

Two mix-tapes are currently in the works as well with a number of local artists and producers. 2018 should be a fun year.

What does your recording set up look like (what do you use to record, what are your favorite tools)? 

I actually just got my first bit of analogue in the studio about a month ago. I’m hype! Right now it’s rigged with a Lexicon studio delay/reverb, ART tube vocal preamp, & dbx comp/gate/limiter with an American Audio circuit breaker up top to keep them all safe. I’ve been working in the box since I started producing/recording so I’ll always know my way around in the dark, but the rack mounts are definitely a new favourite.

In terms of my digital setup, I produce, mix & master in Ableton Live suite, with VST’s & plug-ins from Waves, Native Instrument, Xfer, etc. It’s a nice list, I wont lie, but it’s also about how you use it all, right?

My in-house studio mic for both Wayside & Faces has been the Rode NT2. I love the sound it has when running through the ART preamp & dbx comp – it’s nerdy (haha), one-hundred percent, but that stuff matters on an album. I mix & master my work using Yorkville 8” studio monitors, & I honestly love the sound. I know a lot of people go hard for the Rokit KRKs, but I find them notoriously bass-heavy.

When producing, I have a couple go-to gadgets. I’m low-key ride or die with the MPC drum pads – The sounds are unreal, & as a musician, I like being able to play out my ideas. Another studio favourite is the Ableton Push. It let’s me jam & throw out quick ideas & layers. Other than that, a midi keyboard & a handful of fender guitars, a handful of sample packs, & a couple Shure SM 57’s & 58’s.

Tell us a bit more about your latest video for Cocktails. I understand you’ve just released a promo video for the track.

The video for Cocktails was released as a halloween special. It was kind of inspired by “The Shining” but if Jack Nicholson was a wolf man & I was Wendy – or something like that. It was something really fun for the team to shoot & the first time I brought a good friend on set to act. We got to use some new gear & play around on set with fake blood & masks, so it was good vibes. Like “L.A.”, I edited this music video too.

For my upcoming projects I have developed my media team & have an new editor on board, Andrew Budden of Budden Media, which is cool. I think it’ll free me up to focus on creating & putting out new music & performing in the city. I like to support the local scene, & the homie can shoot, so get stoked for 2018.

Cocktails comes from the Faces EP. How do the tracks from the release combine to tell a story about Palm Baker? How is Cocktails different than L.A.?

L.A. is all about the hustle & the good life. “The livin’ ain’t bad now,” right? Cocktails is probably the polar opposite. It is when you’re tweaky, & caught up in paranoia & bad vibes. It’s drowning. That’s not to say life is about paranoia or feeling shitty, but it happens, & Faces (EP) is all about the different sides of self & others. It’s less glamorous, but it’s human to feel shit sometimes.

Which sort of social media website have you had the best successes with? What about these online services are different from the traditional face to face meeting and performances that musicians utilize?

IG: @palm.baker

I started on IG. Love it. Kinda late to that game, but I like to think fashionably so. It was a new wave of IG, & I was creating solid & consistent media content with beats I whipped together the day before. I’m glad I’m not still caught in that everyday rat race, but it was crazy & fun, & it helped get attention before anyone had any reason to pay attention (haha).

YouTube: Palm Baker T.V.

Lately it has been YouTube for me. With L.A passing 22k & Cocktails at 12k & climbing, I have already begun working with local artists, videographers, & YouTubers to bring much more & higher quality content.

To me, it’s all about the process. I like being able to share the weird hours in the studio, & all-nighters with the fans as well as the big projects.

What should listeners expect from your music in the future? How can interested NeuFutur readers locate samples of your music? How has the radio response been for your music?

I’m currently putting final touches on my next album. I’m really excited – I’m trying to act cool about it though. It happened over the summer & into Sept./Oct. I got producing, & working for other artists across a lot of genres & ended up getting carried away I guess. I had been writing over a couple months & testing new songs at shows, & bought some new gear for the studio to keep things exciting. The rest just happened.

Aside from that, I’ve got my own mix-tape with local artists that I’m producing to sponsor the scene, & (the house producer) II70 picked me up as the feature artist on his mix-tape (dropping 2018), which is hype. It’s a new sound for me to work with & the first time I’m not going to be hands on with the beats – I mean, features are kinda like that, but it’s different with a whole album. But he’s an unreal producer & really easy to work with, so we’re going h.a.m.

What does the rest of 2017 hold for your music and tour date wise?

Summer ’17 was unreal, I traveled out to Montreal to DJ & perform at MTL Uncovered, & was performing big shows in Toronto. To be honest, I took a second, & invested in my studio, brushed up on the basics & not so basics, & hibernated in the studio for a minute after that. I’ve been dying to get back out on stage, & have been DJ-ing in the city, but I’ve been spending most of my time meeting publishers & agents & trying to land the right gigs & shake the right hands, that sort of thing. My hopes set up with 2018 being a very successful year for Baker Music.

Thank you so much for your time. Finally, do you have any additional thoughts about life and the universe for our readers?

Stay a while

 

https://www.facebook.com/palmbakermusic/

An interview with Jerelle

We are talking to Jerelle today. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? For our U.S. readers, can you give us a little education about Kitchener-Waterloo?

Kitchener-Waterloo is a small city of 200,000 people. Just an hour away from Toronto. Always had hometown love for this city but was always wanting to push my music outside of just that city. I grew up in this city. Born and raised by my single mother, helping raise my younger two younger brothers. Continue reading “An interview with Jerelle”

Antherius Talks About “Distant Christmas”

Today, we are speaking with Antherius. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music? 

I’ve always been fond of music, all kinds but mostly Pop.  When I was in grade school my parents bought me a Hammond Organ, and I banged away on that (and the occasional piano outside of home), playing mostly by ear.  In my adult life I learned how to break composite things including machines, circuits, software applications, etc. into their fundamental (more simpler) parts, and decomposing music is no different (e.g. discern out the unique instruments and notes in a recording).  I could hear that arrangements were really nothing more than a clever collection of notes and sounds that complimented each other when played together, and I told myself “I think I can compose and arrange musical works” —  then started applying baby-step efforts to achieve that.  For me, it took latter-day technologies including inexpensive synthesizers and sophisticated sequencing software to enable my creative goal.

You have just released a seasonal album Distant Christmas; what was the writing/creative and recording process for the album like? 

Well, it is certainly challenging to work on Christmas music outside of the holiday season (especially during the Houston’s hot summer months), so this project took me several years to complete.  The process of building a recording is cumulative, that is you start with simple passages, and add instruments (it’s somewhat analogous to creating a great dinner in the kitchen, LOL) – and at key point in this multi-track process, the “magic” occurs when everything seemingly blends itself into a smoother and more sophisticated recording, almost attaining a life of its own.  The efforts to reach this final mix is the long pole in the process – after that the refinement and final mastering steps in the recording are more procedural and iterative (engineering creative as opposed to composition/arrangement creative).

The album art is fascinating; what significance does the hand/design hold for you?  How does Distant Christmas differ from your previous music? What sort of things are a hold-over from earlier recordings? 

The image on the cover is a photo I took of the belfry of the Methodist Church I’ve belonged to for many years in Houston.  A little image manipulation to layer some motion effects (to accentuate the bell itself), along with the stars and sparkles provided by another designer that helped me along created that image.  Insofar as my prior work, the compositions of those early albums were original works, where all but one track in the Distant Christmas album are cover songs, mostly traditionals.  The title track of the album (also called “Distant Christmas”) is an original composition.  The arrangements and instrumentation are similar to my other songs, namely a mix of string sections, modern bass guitars, ambient textures and New Age sound effects.  The album has three upbeat tracks that have percussion instruments added.

How supportive is the Houston music scene in furthering your career (e.g. radio stations, magazine, venues)? 

I’m just a studio/recording artist, not performing live or working with any bands at the moment.  I feel somewhat removed from the general music scene of the city, which is something I need to spend more time with.  I have a few friends in aspects of the music industry, some performers, some mixing engineers, and I have routine meet ups with them to audition tracks and brainstorm ideas for all of the moving parts.

What does your recording set up look like (what do you use to record, what are your favorite tools)? 

The studio setup for single-artist folks like myself has evolved tremendously in the past two decades.  In the 1980’s, my setup was primarily that of analog equipment and tape recorders.  Today, my setup is a couple of racks with my favorite tone generators from Yamaha and Roland, along with some effects processors; although, the most significant hardware is a high-powered Windows PC with sequencing software from SONAR and audio editing tools from Adobe.  I have several favorite “soft-synths” that plug into SONAR, namely Omnisphere and Addictive Drums.  Everything from composition to final mastering is executed by yours truly in that environment.

Which artists are the greatest influences for you and your music? Is there a dream lineup of performers that you would like to perform with if given the chance? 

For me, there have been many, many influences – Moby, Enya, ELO, the Moody Blues, 2002 … although the most pivotal artist for me was discovering Chris Spheeris back in the 1990’s, seemingly a solo performer and composing New Age recordings.  If my work could somehow influence or find some favor from one or more of my musical influencers (or even that of another artist), well that would be a bigger stroke for me than actually performing with them.

Which sort of social media website have you had the best successes with? What about these online services are different from the traditional face to face meeting and performances that musicians utilize? 

Of course, I leverage social media sites including FB, Twitter, to get the word out, and to further develop a fanbase, although I could be better at it.  My extended team is helping me here.  On the interaction front, I prefer F2F; however, newer technologies including email, WebEx meetings, texting, and yes, even voice calls work when in-person meetings are difficult.

What should listeners expect from your music in the future? How can interested NeuFutur readers locate samples of your music?

Everyone should expect me to continue to crank out songs, and for the quality of my work to improve along the way.  Samples of my work can be previewed at SoundCloud, Spotify, and ReverbNation.  The Antherius YouTube site has a couple music videos as well, and I hope to add more there in the coming years.  The best site to follow me on would be FB (facebook.com/antheriusmusic) as it points to all other sites.

What does the rest of 2017 hold for your music and tour date wise? 

The balance of 2017 will find me completing more covers of favorite instrumental hits from the 1960’s and 1970’s, which will be released as singles as they are completed.  There are several original compositions in various stages of development as well for a future album.  There are no plans for touring in the coming year.

Thank you so much for your time. Finally, do you have any additional thoughts about life and the universe for our readers? 

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you, I’ve enjoyed it and truly hope this was found interesting by all.  Final thoughts?  Well, my mantra on life in general is to exist in reality, listen more than you speak, laugh often, push your boundaries, believe in God, and to find peace.

 

I, Symptom Interview

Today, we are speaking with I, Symptom. Can you give us a little background information about yourself? How did you get into music?

Hello to you and all the readers, greetings from Budapest, Hungary. The short introduction of I, Symptom is “electronic rock and roll outlaw”. I’m a rock and roll addict, got my first guitar when I was 14, and I have been playing ever since. I’ve had a variety of projects ranging from art rock to comedy pop, and in this project I’m experimenting with hybrid music. Continue reading “I, Symptom Interview”

Donnell Isaac Interview

What’s your story? I am a husband and a father of 5 beautiful children, who happens to be crazy in love with soul music!

How’d you fall into music? I was exposed to music at an early age. I was only 9 years old when I joined my family gospel group. They nurtured my gift as a singer. Being raised in a musically inclined family, where everyone is either a musician or singer. Inspired my gift of songwriting and singing. This led to me launching my solo career as Donnie C. As my career sailed and matured. I was inspired my growth to change my stage name. Now I go Donnell Isaac

Who are you listening to right now? Angie Stone, Dream album

How has your style evolved and changed over the time since you first started? Over the years I have been told you have a unique sound but it gives a church vibe. I manage to challenge my roots in infusing RnB soul, gospel music together. Where do you think that your songs will go to in the months and years in the future? I believe that my songs will be the type of songs that will live around for many years to come. The music I write and sing, speaks a universal language that allows my listeners to relate, connect and heal.

Loving You is your latest single. What have people had to say about the release so far? Yes, Loving You is my latest single and listeners are saying, yes please bring back this kind of message and sound in RnB. Love conquers when you truly understand love.

What differences in terms of lifestyle, music, or anything have you seen between Portsmouth/Norfolk and the other areas that you have visited? Music has a way of changing lives and bringing people together.

How have you gotten more of your fans – social media (e.g. Snapchat, IG, Facebook, Twitter) or traditional word of mouth? Have you noticed anything different between these types of fans? Most of my fans have been because of social media. Facebook has played a major role in connecting me with my music lovers and supporters.

How should people find your music? Are there any singles or albums coming out that they should consider buying? I am listed in all your online retail outlets including social media. I have a new album in the works. I am truly excited about this project. My new album Love Changes slated for release 2018.