Tacocat Crimson Wave

Yesterday evening, Rookie Magazine premiered “Crimson Wave,” the second mp3 from NVM, the upcoming full-length by Seattle pop-punk faves TacocatBUST Magazine has already praised NVM as a record that’s “full of hilarious jokes, ferocious tambourines, and pop hooks galore” which will have you “struggling to sing along, due to your inability to stifle LOLs.” They single out “Crimson Wave” as a “clever surf-rock ode to dealing with periods.” Stream or download the track at the link above. Tacocat are currently plotting a nationwide tour, including a Valentine’s Day album release bonanza and shows at SXSW 2014. NVM is out on February 25th.

About the record:

Like a fluorescent-lit snack-aisle oasis in some desolate interstate road stop, brimming with Skittles and limited-edition Sno Balls, Tacocat’s Easter-egg-hued pop-punk-pop is bubblegum-sticky with hooks, bound to brighten up the most drab stretch of bummer backroad.

The band’s four-person, seven-layer-burrito came together organically: Lelah Maupin (drums) and Eric Randall (guitar) met in their native Longview, WA—two hours south of Seattle, the very town that Green Day named their breakout debut single after. Lelah’s family room was wallpapered with framed Magic Eye posters, hence “Stereogram,” the cross-eyed love letter to that bizarre ‘90s optical fad. She met lanky Eric while both worked at Safeway, wearing the chain’s distinctive navy aprons before breaking north to Seattle. Eric’s band The Trashies practiced and played in the basement of the 24/7 House in the Central District, where Long Beach, CA native Bree McKenna (bass) was living, amongst the dust, boxes, and spiders. Lelah met Butte, MT native Emily Nokes (voice, tambourine) in one excruciatingly early/boring graphic design class, slipping her a doodled-upon note; she soon noticed Emily’s big voice while she sang along with R. Kelly on the radio. Emily and Bree hit it off one sloshy night at the Comet. Eric impressed Emily with his reenactments of scenes from Anaconda. Sometime around 2007, via countless raucous house party shows, the legend of Tacocat was born.

The foursome would quickly make a name for themselves with their simply energizing power pop, drawing on classic Northwest energy with an uncommonly upbeat, surfy swag that could only come from gray skies and hydroponic sunshine. Their sly and unabashed ‘90s revivalism has, in the past, found the band pondering Evan Dando and Waterworld—and Bree herself explains finding about riot grrrl via Napster and Julia Stiles in 10 Things I Hate About You. They’ve described themselves variously as “Feminist sci-fi” and “Equal parts Kurt and Courtney”; oh well, whatever…NVM

Author: James McQuiston

Ph.D. in Political Science, Kent State University.

I have been the editor at NeuFutur / neufutur.com since I was 15. Looking for new staff members all the time; email me if you are interested. Thanks!

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