Intangible – Elevate (CD)

Intangible – Elevate / 2005 Larkin Music / 4 Tracks / http://www.intangiblemusic.com / http://www.larkiomusic.com / Reviewed 22 March 2005

Intangible begins their EP with “Release”, a track that explores fully the indie-rock influences of the members of the band, allowing a high-flying Creed-like guitar-solo (which looks back to the rock of the sixties) to dominate the bridges on the track. The drums are still the highest part of the disc, for the intensity garnered by the drumbeat during the chorus rival in intensity Justin’s vocals. The tracks sound very polished, and struggle with this polish, in that everything is almost too perfect to be created by just a grouping of people with instruments. The tracks spin through the twin dangers of keeping interest and sounding too self-indulgent, but these issues are present to a lesser degree on these tracks. For example, the repetition found in the arrangements during “Lean” (a track that approaches nearly four minutes) drags the track on to the limits of what most individuals can stomach.

The third track on this EP, “Search” has a very Alice in Chains meets Coldplay feel to it, as the slow pace of the instruments really allow for Justin to shine. The track also tends to drag at point, as the dreamy environ created by the drums and bass is not enough to support the very tenuous and slender guitar solos that make their residence on this track. Most of the time when I actually get EPs for review in the magazine, I have to put forth the little disclaimer that this is not enough music to properly categorize a band. However, one of Intangible’s strong suits is the fact that each one of these songs are ideological and musical relations, allowing for a listener to put on a clip from any of these songs and be able to identify it as an Intangible song.

There is no doubt in my mind that Intangible will be able to break into Clearchannel radio, but the big challenge that the band will have come their full-length album is that the cohesion that works so well in a four-track situation may spell doom in a twelve-track full-length. I’m sure they will come up with an album that accurately represents their talents, but the key thing they seem to lack – a mentality to break free of the box – may be what keeps their first album back from being something truly great. Listen for their single “Those Around You” and decide for yourself if Intangible is the band for you.

Top Track: Release

Rating: 5.6/10

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